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then enters ewe_2

Welcome ewe_2
I promise to post something that will put a smile on you face soon (not this post though)... and I also promise to reply to comments soon.

There have been a lot of post about Matthew Shephard, artkouros posted two news articles that made me quite sad, sad for everyone. I started to write a comment but decided to split it up and post part of it here...

I got my first exposure to hate crimes when I was six years old. It was almost bed time and I was watching TV with the rest of my family when there was a knock at the door. I don’t remember who answered the door, but I remember peering from behind them at the black man who stood on the other side, his face a bloody mess. His teeth knocked out from being repeatedly hit by a brick. Tears running down his bloody face as he spit blood in his pleas for help. We all knew who did this, the Davis kids (roughly ten kids), evil bully, hateful children who lived down the street. They constantly harassed all the neighborhood.

The man who happened on our doorstep after his vicious beating was very lucky. He choose the right door to knock on, my mom was a nurse at the local hospital at the time and immediately tended to his wounds while my father drove to the hospital. He was stabilized and released. Any doubts we had about it being the Davis kids who did this was obliterated as my family became the target for their family. The most telling thing was that constant vandalism of my dad’s van which was used to drive the man to the hospital. He eventually gave up on having speakers since they were stolen so often.

My family was incredibly happy when the family moved away and a very nice Asian family move into their house. I hope they burned lots of sage. I quickly became friends with their son, Loc, who told me even more horror stories about the previous tenants who were always in an out of jail. i had to wonder if any of them went to jail for the beating. Soon after the Davis Family departure the neighborhood began to transform. The neighborhood became diverse, Mexican family across the street, lesbian two doors down, African American, etc etc... Now there is no dominating culture. It’s come a long way from the all white neighborhood where a black man was beaten just for wandering down the street. Everyone gets along now. It’s like the neighborhood is listening to what Rodney King had to say.

I wonder how the poor man who stood on my doorstep so many years ago is doing today. My best wishes go out to him still.

'Til Tuesday: Voices Carry - Various Artists - Legacy Rock Experience

Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
ewe_2
Oct. 15th, 2004 08:37 am (UTC)
OMG.
You truly amaze we with the things you have witnessed in your childhood years and yet you seem like such a compassionate person.

When my family was living in Rockwood, New York it was, and still is, a rural intersection. I was about 16 and had move into a studio apartment because of my step dad. Long story. My Mom and step dad were going through a divorce at this time. We never had much until our mom married our step dad. Then we had a house (not a home though) and he stopped payment on it trying to force our mom, younger brothers and sister out of it. So to get back at him we had some black american freinds that live in the near by city. The neighbors were all rednecks and treat us rotten because of the divorce. Funny how that happen.
Anyhow. My Mom had them call the real estate office and ask to view the our house as prospective buyers.

The phone started ringing 10 minutes after they left. One call including our step dad asking why they were there.

Too funny when I think about it now.

D
monkeyx3
Oct. 18th, 2004 03:45 pm (UTC)
Re: OMG.
What a great story. It's so easy to get people goats when they are closed minded.
ewe_2
Oct. 19th, 2004 06:50 am (UTC)
Re: OMG.
Isn't it?

:-)
D
ewe_2
Oct. 15th, 2004 08:43 am (UTC)
Oh
And I loved that song. And the video too.

D
et_blackbird
Oct. 16th, 2004 05:47 am (UTC)
The man was indeed very lucky to have found your family to help, and, as your father probably knew what the consequences of helping could be, he was brave to help.
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )